2 min

Hypothetical future solutions to hypothetical problems

Don’t worry about the problem of the F-35s
being unequipped to communicate in the Arctic. The Canadian Space Agency should
have a new satellite system in place to take care of that – three years after
we start taking delivery of the planes. Meanwhile, on Power & Politics last night, Peter MacKay said that we
shouldn’t worry because all of these problems are hypothetical, as the planes
won’t start being delivered for five years, and hypothetically, they’ll have
found solutions to those hypothetical problems by that time. Hypothetically.

The Wheat Board issue gets even more
interesting: the NDP now wants seven Conservative MPs to recuse themselves from debate and voting, as they potentially stand to gain from the destruction
of said single-desk selling system if their rhetoric is correct. Meanwhile, the
parliamentary secretary on the file is in hot water after posting a video on
his website about the CWB, which contains the racist phrase “talking Eskimo.”
Should we expect an apology during members’ statements later today?

Liberal MP Sean Casey explains what went
down when he got the veterans affairs committee to agree to his study on the
cuts to the department, and talk about *gasp* holding the government to account
rather than doing self-congratulatory make-work projects. We’ll see whether it now gets shut down.

As the death of the long-gun registry draws
near, here’s part one of a Postmedia series on gun control, starting with
civilianized military-assault weapons, and part two on how lawful gun owners
feel persecuted by police.

Economist Stephen Gordon discusses the unintended consequences of “taxing the rich,” which in the UK has been shown not to
achieve the desired effect, while increased costs were passed on to consumers and
shareholders.

Here’s a rather disturbing story of the
government trying to deport a Canadian-born citizen because of a criminal
record, while disputing his Canadian credentials.

And Kady O’Malley dissects the Conservative
talking point that the Liberals tried to shut down debate on the
plight of Coptic Christians in Egypt. Seems that the government was being disingenuous,
and that there was a dispute over the timing of the debate, with the
Conservatives changing the agreed-on date and the Liberals objecting. What’s
that? Partisan politics using disingenuous arguments? I’m shocked! Shocked, I
say!

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