2 min

Not pursuing the investigation

The RCMP has opted not to pursue its investigation of the government’s decision to improperly reallocate border
infrastructure funds toward G8 legacy projects in the Huntsville area –
even though such reallocations without parliamentary approval go against financial
administration laws. Which isn’t to say that the RCMP couldn’t reopen said
investigation if “significant new evidence” comes to light. That said, Tony
Clement and John Baird’s testimony before a parliamentary committee, that they
used the border infrastructure fund because it was an established framework
they could funnel money through, was protected by parliamentary privilege. But
this isn’t evidence that they were willingly deceiving Parliament? Hard to
believe.

In the event that you missed it, Rob
Nicholson met with Quebec’s justice minister yesterday and pretty much
dismissed everything he had to say out of hand. Said Quebec minister said
this wasn’t the Canadian government he was dealing with but the Reform Party. Meanwhile,
said omnibus crime bill continues to barrel through committee hearings despite
some pretty obvious and glaring shortcomings.

The Liberals, meanwhile, are targeting the
legal community with ads about standing up against the omnibus crime bill.

The information commissioner is warning that destroying the long-gun registry data violates the
spirit and the letter of the Library and Archives of Canada Act and that not
keeping the data for at least two years could jeopardize ongoing court cases.
Not that these kinds of considerations matter to this government.

Here’s a bit more about what the auditor general had to say about problems with information around the stimulus funding,
visas, defence maintenance contracts, the Tobacco Transition Program and
prescription drug assessments.

What’s that? The government admits that it didn’t conduct a broad enough assessment of what killing the Canadian Wheat
Board will actually mean? You don’t say!

The first dozen or so F-35s that we’re
slated to receive will have software aboard that won’t be able to coordinate with ground forces or older planes. Expect this to show up in QP tomorrow
(where a robot-like Julian Fantino will assure us that this is the best
equipment for our men and women in uniform).

And Aaron Wherry talks to Bob Rae about
winning Parliamentarian of the Year, the differences between when he was first
elected and the House of Commons today (ie, lack of
congeniality, a prime minister who used to answer questions), and what he feels
makes a more effective Parliament.

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