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Police discover more human remains linked to Bruce McArthur investigation

Toronto police have conducted over 100 searches at properties connected to McArthur

Toronto police excavate the back of a midtown Toronto property on Mallory Crescent on July 5, 2018, after confirming they found more human remains in relation to the Bruce McArthur investigation. Credit: The Canadian Press/Tijana Martin

Toronto police have discovered more human remains in the investigation into alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur.

The remains were found on July 4 in a ravine behind the Leaside house in midtown Toronto where seven sets of dismembered human remains had previously been found stored in planters around the property.

This is the first time that human remains have been found outside of those planters.

Using canine units, Toronto police have conducted over 100 searches at properties around the Greater Toronto Area that have been linked to McArthur, who worked as a landscaper.

While police conducted minor excavations at some of these properties, they found no additional evidence. The Leaside property was the last premise they had left to search.

“Several weeks ago canine units conducted a search of the ravine at the rear of the premise, several locations of interest were identified,” Detective Sergeant Hank Idsinga told reporters on July 5.

“Yesterday afternoon, human remains were located at one of the first digging sites.”

McArthur has been charged with eight counts of first-degree murder for the deaths of Selim Esen, Majeed Kayhan, Kirushna Kumar Kanagaratnam, Andrew Kinsman, Dean Lisowick, Soroush Mahmudi and Skandaraj Navaratnam.

Police have linked remains to seven of the alleged victims, but have yet to find Majeed Kayhan’s body.

Forensic teams have not yet been able to identify the remains found in the ravine. Idsinga said that identifying who the remains belong to could take anywhere from days to months.

Police will continue to search the ravine behind the Leaside property for at least another week.

Idsinga also said that Toronto police have found no evidence linking McArthur to any of the at least 15 cold cases since 1975 that they were examining.