Vancouver
3 min

Waiting for an empty lap

Steve Brady is an up-and-coming fashion illustrator

KEEPING IT FRESH. Steve Brady's art is his consummate focus. Credit: TJ Ngan

Michael Venus: Okay, sugar, what’s been on your agenda?



Steve Brady: Right now I’m just getting my portfolio together. I went to school for fashion design and finished about a year ago. I really got into the artistic side of it, so I’m pursuing a career as a fashion illustrator. I’m not really down with all the technical shit that goes into it, but the drawing and painting is more for me.



MV: So what do you do for work?



SB: As far as work goes, I hold down a nine-to-fiver at a restaurant, but once I punch out from that, I concentrate on some smaller gigs on the side. I’ve done a little bit of work for Some Product, Neon Angel, a designer by the name of Vladymir Valenti, and whenever she needs me, I give the fabulous Jessica a hand. She’s been my main hook-up so I definitely owe her one. And about my art: it’s pretty much whatever goes. Usually fashion illustration is very stylized and has a specific aesthetic to it, but I don’t want to be conditioned to just one style. I try to keep it fresh, it keeps it more interesting for me.



MV: Is it tough being all work and no play?



SB: I really love it! It’s easy for me to spend time on a project after a long day’s work. It’s a good way to unwind. It also feels pretty good to know that I’m working towards something I have an interest in and something that I’m good at. If I wasn’t working on my illustration, I’d probably just be going out and getting pissed every night (now I just get pissed every other night).



MV: Reveal to the readers your past.



SB: I grew up in Montreal and went to high school in Toronto. When I finished high school I had no idea what it was that I wanted to do. My sister, who was living in Vancouver, suggested I move out here. So I did. I wasn’t out at that time, so looking back on it now, I think moving out here was a way for me to avoid telling my family and friends. I was a really big pussy about coming out; I just didn’t want to deal. But my parents ended up moving out here a year after I did and were like, ‘uh, you’re gay!” My family has been very supportive of me so I consider myself very lucky. They’re great people. So yeah, I’ll be hanging out in Van city for a while.



MV: So have you been a big flaming nelly since the beginning of time?



SB: I was a big flaming kid. I used to put on my sisters’ clothes and shit. I remember my brother walked in on me once and I was wearing my mother’s bra. I’ve since grown out of that but only because I make an ugly woman.



MV: Who has influenced you the most?



SB: I guess my biggest influence would have to have been my design teacher, Lisa. She’s fucking amazing! She taught me a lot, not only about design, but about the industry. She’s very good at what she does. We all loved her. I can actually see into the classroom where she teaches from my window at home. I spy on her but that’s a big secret.



MV: What do you like to do in bed?



SB: Anybody who wants to know the answer to that is going to have to buy me a beer.



MV: What if I give you some candies instead?



SB: No.



MV: What makes Vancouver so cool?



SB: I like the fact that we share the West End with the hetero peeps. I mean, they get a chance to see what we can offer. A lot of cities have a village but it only caters to the gay community. It feels like we’re supported here.



MV: What lies in store for you in the coming years?



SB: I try not to read the homoscopes. All the best things that have happened to me have just fallen into my lap. I’d love to be here doing my art and making some dough. I’m just going to kick around the city for a while, waiting with an empty lap.